LETTERS: Disruptive and inconsiderate fireworks; excellent model | Opinion

Disruptive and inconsiderate

No one should have to put up with what happened at Meridian Ranch over the past few nights and will likely continue until all the illegal fireworks are burned down. This does not include the annual exhibition for our community which took place this year on July 2, which begins just before dark and ends in an hour.

This event is celebrated every year. Apart from this, from July 1, backyard work began, starting around 6 p.m. and increasing in duration each night, ending around 11:15 p.m. on Monday.

These displays appear to be generated from various locations around the golf course, people’s courses, and streets. This happens every year. It is very disruptive and inconsiderate to most residents and causes great distress to pets. We are retired seniors, but some people must be up early to go to work the next day. For my part, I dread the whole week of the 4th of July because of these events. If you engage in this illegal activity, please consider your neighbors and your pets, many of whom are terrified. Please let most of us have a good night’s sleep.

Cindy Cowlishaw

Falcon

What are people thinking?

It’s 8:10 p.m. on the 4th of July! Not yet close to being dark. What a fabulous celebration of our country’s independence is underway. Firecrackers that go off every few seconds. Dogs howl in their yard. Whining puppies, cats shivering under beds, horses staring wild with fear. People reading the news on the internet about the carnage in Highland Park. Bloody bodies covered in bloody sheets.

Can you tell the difference between the sound of firecrackers and the sound of guns? I’m not, and I’ve been around both for most of my 70s.

What are people thinking? In this age of wanton gun violence, your neighbors and mine are very sensitive to explosions in their neighborhood. The cat will be fine tomorrow morning, but not my neighbors. If you want to celebrate our country’s independence, help your neighbor any way you can, but please don’t terrorize them with explosives.

Although this is illegal, the police are powerless to enforce it. I just had to close the windows because of the noise and the smoke. Knowing that it will last at least the next four hours. Happy Independence Day!

Marc Robin

colorado springs

Great model

Thanks to Eric Sondermann for his insightful analysis of the Colorado governor’s leadership over the past six decades.

I particularly appreciate his assessment of Bill Ritter, the former Denver district attorney who served one term between 2006 and 2010. Sondermann calls Governor Ritter a “workhorse, not parade horse,” a man more concerned with putting implement good politics rather than petty politics. That’s right.

Undeterred by politics or partisan pressure, Governor Ritter appointed me, a Republican (lifetime Republican, at the time), Mayor of Manitou to serve as Insurance Commissioner for the State of Colorado. We shared a passion and concern for consumer protection and fairness, particularly with respect to health insurance.

The Great Recession was a difficult time to be a leader, but Governor Ritter handled it with grace and humility. He remains an excellent role model for those seeking or holding elected leadership positions.

Marcy Morisson

Manitou springs

stop this madness

The more dangerous objects are available to the public, the worse the results. Car accidents increase with the number of cars on the road. So we regulate them. You must pass tests and be allowed to drive legally. We enforce speed limits to reduce danger. Automakers are compelled, either by regulation or market forces, to provide safer vehicles.

So what about guns? One cannot attend parades, malls, grocery stores, concerts, or send one’s children to school without fear that an aggrieved person will vent his anguish on a group of innocent people. More weapons? Arm the teachers? There are so many soft targets. How can they all be hardened?

Is it a mental health issue? So should we ask every human being to take a psychological exam every six weeks to flesh out possible mass killers?

Is it more intrusive to freedom than subjecting gun owners to constraints that can protect the vast majority? And what about military-style rifles? Weapons made to destroy people at 45 rounds per minute. Who can seriously say that our Founders, who only knew muskets and cannons, wanted citizens to have such instruments of death? Isn’t it just plain insane to place the value of someone getting “a high” on one of these machines on the lives of 18 children and two teachers in Uvalde? It’s time for our legislators to get serious, get to work, stop this madness of gun violence.

Sam Gould

Divide

withdraw from power

Seven elections in a row, Americans have chosen the presidential candidate least interested in maintaining the world order we have created. Consequently, when it comes to foreign policy, American leaders have generally been unwilling to sacrifice short-term comfort for long-term strategic gains. Joe Biden, for example, repeatedly canceled routine missile tests to avoid “provoking Putin” and backtracked on State Department statements about the desired outcome of the Russian-Ukrainian war. Before that, Barack Obama did absolutely nothing about the Chinese occupation of Scarborough Shoal or the red line in Syria and George Bush Jr’s only response to the Russian invasion of Georgia was a harsh hiccup.

Our behavior on the foreign scene is weak and timid for an unrivaled military power. What is the point of such military and economic prowess if we are not even willing to use them systematically for deterrence purposes?

On the one hand, I understand the desire to withdraw from the world. If any country could survive the transition from a globalist economy to relative autarky, it is the United States. But if we demobilize and become a self-sustaining “Fortress America,” not only will we destroy the world order, which has brought about phenomenal improvements. on the global quality of life, we will eventually feel the effects as well. Someone will step into the void we leave behind, and we might end up walking at their pace – and they probably won’t be as likely to try and push for positive change.

Dominique Cingoranelli

Black Forest

Rebecca R. Santistevan